I  test theories of community ecology against
global change factors using experiments, observations and syntheses. 

More specifically, I am driven by the question: 
how do global change factors (e.g. climate warming and drought) affect species interactions and what are the implications of those altered interactions for community structure and ecosystem functions? 

To answer this broad question, I have mainly worked with soil microorganisms, soil invertebrates and plant communities from both grasslands and forests. But in general, I am interested in any system and organism where I can intersect community- and global change ecology.

Scientific Career

2018-Present:
Post-doctoral candidate
(DFG Research fellow) at Netherlands Institute of Ecology 
(NIOO-KNAW), Wageningen, The Netherlands
Supervisor: Prof. Wim van der Putten

 

2018-2021:
Co-Principal investigator
- Warming Effects on Plant Soil interplay and ecosystem functioning in Wadden Sea Salt marshes (WEPSS), University of Hamburg, Germany

 

2016- 2018:
Post-doctoral candidate
in Eisenhauer Lab/Experimental Interaction Ecology, German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv) Halle-Jena-Leipzig and Leipzig University, Leipzig, Germany
Supervisor: Prof. Nico Eisenhauer

Education

2013-2016:
Doctoral degree
(summa cum laude) in Prof. Nico Eisenhauer’s Lab (Experimental Interaction Ecology), German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv) Halle-Jena-Leipzig and Leipzig University, Leipzig, Germany

Topic: Plant-soil interactions in a changing world: A consumer-resource perspective


2010-2012:
Master of Science:
Forest and Nature Conservation (Specialization in Soil Ecology), Wageningen University and Research Center, the Netherlands


 2006-2008:
 Master of Science:
Environmental Management, Pokhara University, Nepal


 2003-2006:
 Bachelor of Science: Environmental Science, Tribhuvan University, Nepal